Socially Engineered Rap


“The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation”

APRIL 24, 2012

… anonymous letter …

Hello,

After more than 20 years, I’ve finally decided to tell the world what I witnessed in 1991, which I believe was one of the biggest turning point in popular music, and ultimately American society. I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day. So I’ve simply decided to leave out names …

Between the late 80’s and early 90’s, I was what you may call a “decision maker” with one of the more established company in the music industry. …  In early 1991, I was invited to attend a closed door meeting with a small group of music business insiders to discuss rap music’s new direction. … The meeting was held at a private residence on the outskirts of Los Angeles. I remember about 25 to 30 people being there, most of them familiar faces. …

Among the attendees was a small group of unfamiliar faces who stayed to themselves and made no attempt to socialize beyond their circle. Based on their behavior and formal appearances, they didn’t seem to be in our industry. Our casual chatter was interrupted when we were asked to sign a confidentiality agreement preventing us from publicly discussing the information presented during the meeting. … The agreement was … clear … that violating the terms would result in job termination. …

(At the meeting we were told) that the respective companies we represented had invested in a very profitable industry which could become even more rewarding with our active involvement … that the companies we work for had invested millions into the building of privately owned prisons and that our positions of influence in the music industry would actually impact the profitability of these investments. … We were told that these prisons were built by privately owned companies who received funding from the government … the more inmates, the more money the government would pay these prisons. …

(We were told) that since our employers had become silent investors in this prison business, it was now in their interest to make sure that these prisons remained filled. Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice. He assured us that this would be a great situation for us because rap music was becoming an increasingly profitable market for our companies, and as employee, we’d also be able to buy personal stocks in these prisons. …

I remember looking around to make sure I wasn’t dreaming and saw half of the people with dropped jaws. My daze was interrupted when someone shouted, “Is this a f****** joke?” At this point things became chaotic. Two of the men who were part of the “unfamiliar” group grabbed the man who shouted out and attempted to remove him from the house. A few of us, myself included, tried to intervene. One of them pulled out a gun and we all backed off. They separated us from the crowd and all four of us were escorted outside. My industry colleague who had opened the meeting earlier hurried out to meet us and reminded us that we had signed agreement and would suffer the consequences of speaking about this publicly or even with those who attended the meeting. I asked him why he was involved with something this corrupt and he replied that it was bigger than the music business and nothing we’d want to challenge without risking consequences. … The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off.

I considered speaking out publicly … but I realized I’d probably be jeopardizing more than my job … I thought about those men with guns and wondered who they were? I had been told that this was bigger than the music business … . I tried to do a little bit of research on private prisons but didn’t uncover anything about the music business’ involvement. However, the information I did find confirmed how dangerous this prison business really was. …

As the months passed, rap music had definitely changed direction. … Rap acts that talked about politics or harmless fun were quickly fading away as gangster rap started dominating the airwaves. Only a few months had passed since the meeting but I suspect that the ideas presented that day had been successfully implemented. It was as if the order has been given to all major label executives. The music was climbing the charts …  Everyone bought into it, consumers included. Violence and drug use became a central theme in most rap music. …

I officially quit the music business in 1993 … . As the years passed, I managed to keep my secret, … but as rap got worse, my guilt grew. Fortunately, in the late 90’s, having the internet … made it easier for me to investigate what is now labeled the prison industrial complex. Now that I have a greater understanding of how private prisons operate, things make much more sense than they ever have. I see how the criminalization of rap music played a big part in promoting racial stereotypes and misguided so many impressionable young minds into adopting these glorified criminal behaviors which often lead to incarceration. Twenty years of guilt is a heavy load to carry but the least I can do now is to share my story, hoping that fans of rap music realize how they’ve been used for the past 2 decades. Although I plan on remaining anonymous for obvious reasons, my goal now is to get this information out to as many people as possible. Please help me spread the word. …

Thank you.

The above post had about 2,000 comments, so here is a link to Read More.

Why did I title this post “Socially Engineered Rap?” That is because it is an example of social engineering. You can read about social engineering through the music industry in the sixties in anther post, titled, Flower Power – a CIA PsyOp and don’t you think social media is an ideal forum for social engineering? Read Society’s Face(book) Lift. Or, to answer how it is that American society has consistently moved to the left for the last fifty years, you can read Cultural Marxism and You.

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About icliks

Biding my time in central ms ... yours too, if ur reading this.
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