Tax Liens

If [after you purchase a lien] the property goes into foreclosure [which is initiated by you, the lien-holder, or I suppose, other parties], the lienholder may discover there are other liens on the property, which can make it impossible to obtain the title.

Read more: Investing in Property Tax Liens | Investopedia https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/061313/investing-property-tax-liens.asp#ixzz5PJwiYLUf
Follow us: Investopedia on FacebookNTLA advises dividing the face amount of the delinquent tax lien by the market value of the property. If the ratio is above 4%, potential buyers should stay away from that property. Furthermore, there could also be other liens on the property that will prevent the bidder from taking ownership of it.

Every piece of real estate in a given county with a tax lien is assigned a number within its respective parcel. Buyers can look for these liens by number in order to obtain information about them from the county (this can often be done online). For each number, the county has the property address, the name of the owner, the assessed value of the property, the legal description, and a breakdown of the condition of the property and any structures located on the premises.

Read more: Investing in Property Tax Liens | Investopedia https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/061313/investing-property-tax-liens.asp#ixzz5PJuz9Rh3
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